Freak Summertime Snowfall Hits Gansu

May 30, 2013 By eChinacities.com Comments (0)     Add your comment Newsletter

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Freak Summertime Snowfall Hits Gansu

You’d have thought by now that most parts of China would have seen the last of snow until next winter. Not for Gansu though, as a sudden cold snap hit many parts of the southern section of the province during the evening of May 28.

The snowfall ceased around 08:00 the next morning, though many southern parts of Gansu saw 38 cm of the white stuff, which forced many confused citizens to go dig out their winter coats again.

The Gansu Meteorological Department reported that much of southern Gansu is around 3,000m above sea level, and that sudden cold snaps and bouts of snowfall this time of year aren’t actually that uncommon.

See also: 2,000 Year-Old Western Han Dynasty Wine Unearthed in Shandong

Keywords: Gansu Meteorological Department summertime snowfall

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