Why oh Why? 5 Bewildering Chinese Activities Explained

Why oh Why? 5 Bewildering Chinese Activities Explained
Jul 01, 2013 By Ailsa Zheng , eChinacities.com

Have you ever stopped to ask yourself why it is that Chinese restrooms are lacking in toilet paper? Why pregnant women wear those apron-thingies on their way to work? What the obsession with keeping noisy, screeching crickets is about? Why people walk backwards in the morning, all the while clapping their hands rhythmically? Or why that peddler wakes you up with his yelling early in the morning?

Everyday activity can astound and bewilder us when we’re not familiar with the culture. So why is it that Chinese people do what they do? Why is it that…

1) Chinese restrooms don’t have toilet paper?
The empty toilet paper dispenser of a Chinese public restroom has quite a few things in common with your least favorite sweater: it’s ugly to look at, it isn’t being used, and every glance at it reminds you of what could have been.

Anyone who has been in Mainland China for longer than one week knows that finding a public bathroom that actually stocks toilet paper is near impossible. Sure, you can go to the third floor of that fancy-looking hotel while pretending you’re a guest, but that doesn’t really count. Besides, the last time I tried, they didn’t have toilet paper either.

But why?

Most of us immediately think it’s so whoever owns the bathroom can save someRMB. I did too, until I noticed a peculiar incident at the local KFC.

One day, when I was standing in line at KFC, a little old woman in her sixties came by and stood next to the counter. She didn’t buy anything. Instead, she pressed the straw dispenser. She pressed it over twenty times. I watched as she collected a huge bundle of straws, dump them all in her purse, and walk out of KFC without buying a thing.

What the old woman did wasn’t technically stealing. She was simply taking advantage of whatever she could get for free. The same could be said for toilet-paper thieves.

The stealing of toilet paper from public restrooms is common practice throughout all of China, frustrating city management and business owners alike. Few are willing to stock their bathrooms with toilet paper when guests simply take the entire roll home with them.

Although stealing something as cheap and ordinary as toilet paper may seem ludicrous to us Westerners, bear in mind that the salary of an ordinary Chinese service worker is little more than slave wages to most of us. A roll of toilet paper may seem so insignificant to us that we won’t bother carrying it all the way home with our bare hands, even if it were socially acceptable to do so. But for many Chinese people who live on less than 2000 Yuan a month, they see a cost that could be avoided.

ridiculous Chinese maternity wear
Anti-radiation maternity wear. Photo: typepad.com

2) Why do pregnant women wear those apron-thingies?
You notice that your pregnant coworker wears a childish, apron-like maternity dress whenever she sits in front of her work computer. That’s nothing unusual—maybe it’s a fashion statement. It’s certainly better than some of Kim Kardashian’s maternity clothes.

But then, you notice she wears the exact same apron-like maternity dress every day. Surely she can spare the money for two different maternity dresses, right? Why does she wear the same dress every day?

The reason? Her maternity dress is more than a maternity dress—it is an anti-radiation apron.

A what?

In China, there is widespread belief that low levels of radiation emitted from computers can cause birth defects and/or other negative effects on pregnant women. Two of my father’s Chinese graduate students took a hiatus from their studies just to avoid using a computer during their pregnancies.

But wait, you ask. How come I’ve never seen pregnant women in my own country use these anti-radiation maternity dresses? That’s because the fetus-harming computer radiation theory is a bunch of baloney, according to the World Health Organization. However, this has not stopped businesses from profiting off of such fears.

Anti-radiation clothing has also been reported to do more harm than good. This is because clothing that blocks out radiation can also trap it in. This would, in turn, expose a pregnant woman to more radiation than what she would have normally received, had she not worn such clothing in the first place.

Unfortunately, China does not have any industry standard that prevents such clothing from being sold.

3) Why do Chinese people like crickets so much?
It’s hard for a Westerner to understand why Chinese people love to keep crickets as pets. They make a loud ruckus from dawn to dusk that resembles the ringing you get in your ears when you smack your head against the open cabinet door.

What’s more, these hard-shelled creatures aren’t the least bit cuddly. You don’t want to touch them, they live for two months tops, and your daily interaction with them is the five seconds it takes to push that little bean through the holes of its bamboo cage every morning. Why do Chinese people, especially old Chinese people, love to keep these six-legged pests around so much?

The reality: Crickets have been in Chinese culture for thousands of years, beloved by emperors and commoners alike. Chinese cricket culture involves two different types of crickets: singing crickets, and fighting crickets.

Singing crickets, or jiaoguoguo, are pets for children. According to legend, singing crickets were kept by imperial concubines to feel less lonely. (Like many Western families, a Chinese family that desires pets can sometimes find a dog or cat too furry, too messy, or too darn bothersome to take responsibility for.) But while a Western family may settle for something quiet and fuzzy like a hamster or a gerbil, the Chinese settle for crickets.

In some ways, the cricket can be an ideal pet: it costs very little, doesn’t stink, is easy to take care of, and is roughly 35% more interactive than a goldfish. Its short, two-month lifespan also means that a Chinese child can play with it all summer before forsaking it once the school year starts up.

Fighting crickets, or xishuai, are used for entertainment purposes. While Western countries have familiarized themselves with cockfights and bull fights, the Chinese send crickets at their opponents. Money is often involved, despite China’s outlaw on gambling.

4) Why do old people walk backwards in the morning?
When I lived in the dorms at East China Normal University, I could always peek out my window and see old people walking backwards along the track field early in the morning or late at night. They clapped their hands together methodically while doing so.

Walking backwards, or “retrowalking,” is a form of light exercise that the Chinese have been doing since ancient times. Walking backwards is more tiring than walking forwards, and this will give you a better cardio workout in general. But that’s not the only effect it has: according to an article published in the North American Journal of Medical Sciences, retrowalking has a positive effect on patients with knee osteoarthritis. And you know who has osteoarthritis? Old people.

That isn’t where the benefits of walking backwards ends. According to a Dutch study, walking backwards may also sharpen your thinking.

And as for the hand-clapping? While the methodical hand-clapping may look silly and resembles a poor man’s chest fly, it does give your arms some exercise to do.

5) What is that old peddler guy calling out every morning?
After you have lived in China for long enough, you will notice that every once in a while, an old Chinese man with a bench and a bike will ride through your neighborhood slowly while calling out the same phrase, over and over again. And no, it is not the same old man pedaling through all of China on a Forrest Gump-inspired journey.

What this man is actually saying is “mo jian zi lai…qiang cai dao!” which means “I’m here to sharpen your knives…and your scissors!”

This man is a blade sharpener. He goes from street to street, sharpening kitchen knives for a couple of RMB. This profession is dying, since most Chinese people now have their own whetstones in their kitchens. Thus, today’s blade sharpeners are well over the age of fifty and have decades of blade-sharpening expertise to boot. The few blade sharpeners that remain still get business, thanks to customers who desire exceptionally sharp blades.

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Keywords: Chinese activities

24 Comments

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1

zhuxi87
comment|39483|250769

great article! Really useful. please write more!!! :)

Aug 08, 2013 11:55 Report Abuse

2

jomosino
comment|38774|259053

Nice article. 1. Toilet paper. For a few months I ran a bar/restaurant in Xishuangbanna. Backpackers were impressed with toilet paper, and locals never stole any. But you're right - I guess we never got any really poor people in. 2. In my more normal guise as a teacher in private schools, I would like to add a comment to the pregnncy observation. Women who get pregnant, start wearing 'pregnant clothes' as soon as it's confirmed. Radiation apart - they want to show off the fact of thei (usually only) pregnancy. Any thoughts on staying in bed for a month and not washing your hair etc? 3. A student told me that walking backwards stimulates the 'other' half of your brain? John.

Jul 05, 2013 16:03 Report Abuse

3

LeslieInShanghai
comment|38675|101272

This is a great collection of "oh, now I understand" moments. Thanks so much. Also, according to my simple, foreigner understanding, there is one other reason why, as people walk forwards and backwards, clap their hands, besides keeping their hands busy. As I know, this is a form of QiGong. Give it a try and you'll instantly feel the tingle of the flow of blood in your hands increasing. This, according to QiGong as I understand, promotes the flow of Qi and is thus healthier.

Jul 03, 2013 00:59 Report Abuse

4

Guest2327316
comment|38640|258590

Further info about the anti-radiation maternity clothes can be found at: http://www.szdaily.com/content/2011-12/21/content_6325648.htm

Jul 02, 2013 10:46 Report Abuse

5

DaqingDevil
comment|38622|58569

Apart from the toilet paper I didn't know any of those other things. Interesting and just adds to the weirdness of this place. Or are we strange and they are normal? Another 2 years here carrying my own toilet paper everywhere I go and I will think it's normal!!

Jul 01, 2013 23:07 Report Abuse

6

Guest423524
comment|38609|47058

The toilet paper thing is one where I just can't get past my western sensibilities on. I make a conscious effort to avoid any place that doesn't offer TP. I just find it really disrespectful, like it's saying "we think that you, our customer who is giving us money for a product or service, are a thief." I wouldn't tolerate that attitude from a business in the west so why should I accept it here? If a business (probably rationally) thinks that their customers are going to steal toilet paper from them, then I can tell it's just not a place I belong.

Jul 01, 2013 11:19 Report Abuse

7

sam239
comment|38662|66598

Just give into the way things are run here. A 6 pack of Tempo napkins runs for 6 kuai at the local luxury grocery store. It is soft and doesn't rip, even when wet. Just carry a few packs of those around and you'll be fine. Too bad they don't just do it SE Asian style and have a hose in the stall, it's much cleaner that way.

Jul 02, 2013 19:07 Report Abuse

8

Guest423524
comment|38689|47058

I did that for my first year out of uni, tried to get the real 'china experience' i guess, but once I moved out of esl teaching and into the real expat world I realized theres no reason a western person should live like that. I'm lucky to have been born to a good supportive family in the west. I'm lucky to have found success here and so i choose to live the closest approximation of a totally western lifestyle here that I can. Guess what? the successful Chinese do too. It's only excuse-makers (including me three years ago ;) ) from the west who think it's cool to live grimy. And by the way...i'm happy. I have a nice comfortable life here with very few 'chinese discomforts'. It's entirely possible to live a normal successful life in China.

Jul 03, 2013 12:01 Report Abuse

9

Guest460892
comment|38811|51210

You must be a male for one because a female would just think of it as another thing to carry in her purse and move on about it. Since you have seen all of China already and know everything then I hope you never go out from your house again. Or if you do, don't forget your nappie as it would be absolutely ridiculous to have toilet paper on your person should the need ever arise. You are living a sheltered and useless life. Congratulations, your parents must be so proud.

Jul 07, 2013 14:31 Report Abuse

10

sam239
comment|38814|66598

(1) How is ESL teaching not "the real expat world"? (2) There is plenty of reason a western person would live like that. It is China, after all. If you expect businesses to provide your toilet paper for you, then you must be very limited in where you go here. (3) What is a "normal" "successful" life? Sounds like something where you have all the "security" but no zest in life. The sort of expats who think ESL teachers are below them, or are not living a "normal successful life", need to get over themselves.

Jul 07, 2013 21:19 Report Abuse

11

Guest423524
comment|38825|47058

Hey, in my first year out of college in 2009 I was all about experiencing the local life. I lived in a small city in Sichuan where I was literally one of three foreigners; I backpacked around to see other places in the countryside. It was an interesting and more or less fun experience, but one thing I really took away from that was that it really SUCKS being poor and so having that experience at 22 really scared me straight and helped make me the super hard working, moderately successful person I am now at 26. The trap of ESL teaching is that you are comparing yourselves to people who lack opportunity. Yes, most Chinese people would kill for that 10,000 rmb per month esl salary, but WE ARE NOT CHINESE. Our grandparents and parents didn’t sacrifice so we could feel good about ourselves making more than 3rd world laborers. That doesn’t mean we’re better than them, but it does mean we have better opportunities and should have higher expectations. I do want to live comfortably and that has nothing to do with a zest for life. I like the idea of a nice trip to Tokyo or Paris; I like having the option to buy as much or as little foreign groceries as I like. I feel happy every day that I’m one day more experienced and closer to landing a big promotion or getting an even more exciting opportunity. And you say I don’t have a zest for life? Hey, backpacking and staying in hostels is cool when you’re 23 and definitely a fun experience, but @25? @30? At some point shouldn’t you have made some progress in your life? Shit, I’m not better than anybody but I think a lot of ESL teachers are kinda delusional about the lives they are going to have over the long term. Again, maybe you’re ok with the limitations of having to spend more than 15% of your yearly income just to visit your family/friends ONCE IN A YEAR and living in what most western people would consider to be poor quality housing and eating cheap food and not having the option to buy a car (let alone a house); maybe you’re ok with that for now, but if you’re an esl teacher, you have to be OK with that forever. You can work more hours, that’s it. I was there. And you know what? I am proud that when my folks came to visit I could say “hey don’t worry about a hotel, I have a nice guest room for you”. First time my old man ever looked at me like an equal. Can’t put a price on that.

Jul 08, 2013 12:19 Report Abuse

12

sam239
comment|38830|66598

OK, that makes more sense, but at the same time, I don't know that the kind of "progress" you speak of is that attractive for the adventurous types who would come here as ESL teachers. If someone wants the sort of western lifestyle that you are speaking of, they should go back to the west, where it's going to be a lot cheaper (due to fewer import taxes and more selection), more secure, and will come with a money-back guarantee. The question is: are there options for staying here long term other than ESL teaching (or teaching, say, in an international school) or working for an MNC? Also I have met a number of people who are quite "poor", make less than 10 dollars a day, but seemed to have quite decent lives.

Jul 08, 2013 15:07 Report Abuse

13

Guest423524
comment|38853|47058

Well by progress I guess I just mean having more options as you get older; like I said backpacking and adventure can be really fun but what if one day you get tired of it and just want to fly somewhere and stay in a nice hotel? When I was teaching obviously I was really young and it was a great sense of freedom having all that spare time and no expectations and getting to travel around and go on adventures; but then when I met older teachers who had been here for 10 years+ I really got the feeling that one day the freedom of not having any responsibility becomes a prison of not having any money. It takes a lot of planning to set yourself up for a solid career, and most of the entry level positions these days are INCREDIBLY demanding (I routinely work 65 hrs+ in a week usually including at least one weekend day) so your mid 20s are basically the only time in your life that you’re going to have the energy to do that. On the other hand, $60K USD per year goes pretty far here in terms of both living and savings. No, right now I don’t need/want a McMansion in the suburbs, 5-star hotels or a luxury car. But what about when I’m 40? I can’t predict what my goals/values are going to be in 15 years, but I DO know that if we don’t set ourselves up for solid careers now that we will NEVER have the option for those things in the future if we do want them. As for why I am in China if I want to live a western life…China is where I have a good job. I mean yeah I am looking for that killer 6-figure job in Los Angeles or something so I do occasionally send out resumes and speak with firms back home, but it will probably take a couple more years of good experience to get it. In the meantime, yeah why shouldn’t I live a comfortable life day-to-day? Having had the experience of living in probably not even a 3rd tier city (not even mcdonalds or KFC) I appreciate nice things a lot more than before. I also understand that because I don’t have a big inheritance coming my way or a cushy job at a family business waiting for me that I need to work my butt off if I want to deserve them.

Jul 09, 2013 09:27 Report Abuse

14

Guest423524
comment|38854|47058

And yeah there are options for staying in China other than ESL. Probably the best way to break into the professional ranks here is to find a B2B sales position for a company dealing with the west (or better yet western owned). Even if you don't like sales, it's the easiest job to get tho it may not pay a salary at first (commissions only) and it will FORCE you to network and meet successful people you can learn from. Save up some $ and get your butt to a first-tier city ASAP. There aren't many salaried professional positions available to entry level foreigners anymore, but sales is a good option to get started.

Jul 09, 2013 09:33 Report Abuse

15

sam239
comment|38858|66598

OK thanks for the time put forth in explaining that. I teach a subject level class for an international program (Chinese management) and find it satisfying and well-paying, but it doesn't come with basic-level security such as a pension and good insurance. So something better would be interesting. At the same time, getting stuck in a cubicle job or similar unsatisfying job, does not sound like a good trade-off. There must be something in the middle, a career that's interesting and "cool" but also provides some level of security.

Jul 09, 2013 11:25 Report Abuse

16

Guest423524
comment|38865|47058

I think working in management consulting is pretty cool, it's got some of that "wow" factor when you tell people you do it, and the work is varied and genuinely interesting if a little bit excel-heavy. I know corporate office jobs can seem kinda intimidating, but as long as you can see a path for advancement and your superiors respect your work it keeps you sharp and engaged. Personally I think you have it backwards, I found teaching in china to be incredibly repetitive and demoralizing, as telling people here you're a teacher gets you more than a few eye rolls in big cities, whereas corporate jobs are cool, stable, and demonstrate ambition and responsibility. And also...if you're single, the dating scene opens up to include so many beautiful, smart, sophisticated women, from all over the world, not just the local girls, who (completely reasonably) just wouldn't be interested in the ESL teacher's lifestyle.

Jul 09, 2013 14:56 Report Abuse

17

babyfacetony
comment|38958|75291

I think some things you said are true.But I will disagree with most of your view.First,to say that ESL expats are less successful than their counterparts in other fields is not totally true.I'm a graduate with a college degree and I've been teaching esl for almost 10yrs in China.I've thaught all levels of students in kindergaten,elememtary,middle /high sch,college/university and adult classes.Going by your definition of success on a job,I think I'm successful than some people who works in other areas apart from esl.I have a house and 2 cars.I almost finished my house in my home country.A modern 4 bedroom suite bungalow.I live in Shanghai.One of the most expensive places in the world and from one of the countries you and your people often refers to as "3rd world".And I teach Esl!When people ask me about my job,I say it with pride that I'm a teacher cos I have something to show for it.My point is,the field you're working in don't really bring success to your life.But how you use that field to bring the desire success you want.And I want you to know that,my good friends who are also teachers are as successful as me.I even helped many of so called high rise office expat to get part-time teaching job!I quite agree esl job is not a job that can be done for a long time.Especially when one is getting older.I think it's same with other jobs too if it's China.And the reason people think there's no much respect for esl teachers in China is cos every dick and harry that speaks English and especially if you're white can be a teacher.There's no govt regulation.But in terms of salary,I think it's good like other fields.You just have to show the stuff you're made of to command very good pay.I don't need to mention how much I've earned or earning.But if I have 2 cars and a house in Shanghai,think of it.I'm now 40,and I registered my own trading company and doing internship at a logistics company.And I'm still teaching esl.To succeed,you just have to plan well.It does not depend on which field you are,but what you are doing in that field.

Jul 12, 2013 15:13 Report Abuse

18

babyfacetony
comment|38959|75291

I think some things you said are true.But I will disagree with most of your view.First,to say that ESL expats are less successful than their counterparts in other fields is not totally true.I'm a graduate with a college degree and I've been teaching esl for almost 10yrs in China.I've thaught all levels of students in kindergaten,elememtary,middle /high sch,college/university and adult classes.Going by your definition of success on a job,I think I'm successful than some people who works in other areas apart from esl.I have a house and 2 cars.I almost finished my house in my home country.A modern 4 bedroom suite bungalow.I live in Shanghai.One of the most expensive places in the world and from one of the countries you and your people often refers to as "3rd world".And I teach Esl!When people ask me about my job,I say it with pride that I'm a teacher cos I have something to show for it.My point is,the field you're working in don't really bring success to your life.But how you use that field to bring the desire success you want.And I want you to know that,my good friends who are also teachers are as successful as me.I even helped many of so called high rise office expat to get part-time teaching job!I quite agree esl job is not a job that can be done for a long time.Especially when one is getting older.I think it's same with other jobs too if it's China.And the reason people think there's no much respect for esl teachers in China is cos every dick and harry that speaks English and especially if you're white can be a teacher.There's no govt regulation.But in terms of salary,I think it's good like other fields.You just have to show the stuff you're made of to command very good pay.I don't need to mention how much I've earned or earning.But if I have 2 cars and a house in Shanghai,think of it.I'm now 40,and I registered my own trading company and doing internship at a logistics company.And I'm still teaching esl.To succeed,you just have to plan well.It does not depend on which field you are,but what you are doing in that field.

Jul 12, 2013 15:16 Report Abuse

19

Guest423524
comment|38962|47058

Wow a house and 2 cars in shanghai is certainly a real accomplishment! I'm really happy to hear that smart planning and hard work have paid off for you. However, I do think that you are probably more of an exception than a rule. Don't think I look down on somebody because of what country they are from. It sounds like you have really good values and probably worked your ass off to get somewhere in life. I take more issue with people who ARE from developed countries and have no drive to succeed. Just sit around lazy because they are white and here in china that's all it takes to be a little bit comfortable. Tony, I wish you the absolute best of luck with your trading company and hope that internship gets you even further. Take care

Jul 12, 2013 15:56 Report Abuse

20

sam239
comment|38977|66598

"as telling people here you're a teacher" Well you're certainly welcome to live as you want to live, but it seems like an unwise mistake to base one's career entirely on how it makes you appear to others. To give an example, I have a family member who is (by your standards) very successful, a high-level corporate lawyer in the US who pulls in a big salary, wines and dines with judges and politicians, all that jazz. The only problem is I can see that none of this makes this person happy, at the end of the day. The buzz wears off. Also the fact that local girls in Shanghai would look down on somebody simply for being an ESL teacher makes them seem completely superficial. Teaching is an honorable profession. If sb looks down on a person simply for being an ESL teacher...well they're probably just a gold-chaser to begin with. The more I hear about Beijing and Shanghai lifestyles and attitudes, the more I think "you can keep your snotty attitudes, and keep your nasty air as well!".

Jul 13, 2013 19:58 Report Abuse

21

Guest423524
comment|39006|47058

I agree with you absolutely that living to impress others is a slippery slope. But I will also assert that just as living solely to impress others doesn't lead to happiness, the same is true of the notion that anyone who judges someone negatively is inherently being shallow or wrong. Sometimes we all need negative feedback to see ourselves more clearly. The central thesis of my argument is that ESL teaching is specifically and singularly a career black hole. Even though teaching is definitely a noble thing, ESL teaching abroad is not a viable career path. The way that ESL teaching in China is run, it's more of a service industry job than serving as a true professional educator. I would consider your average 20s ESL teacher (including myself before I got out) to have more in common with an educated but underemployed kid working at a starbucks, than with a high school literature teacher. I agree with you that if a girl's ONLY criteria for dating is having millions of dollars, then yes she is a gold digger. But we aren't talking about being rich, we're talking about just being middle class at some point in life; that's why I think it's better to consider ESL a service job rather than a professional career because that's what it is in terms of your future prospects.I'm sure that we all (men and women) have our own standards when it comes to dating that we consider to be perfectly reasonable. Please don't take this post as being sexist either, i'm dating an american career woman working in my field who is every bit as talented and ambitious as me. But...even in 2013 it's still not as socially acceptable for a guy to 'date up' as a woman.

Jul 15, 2013 09:05 Report Abuse

22

sam239
comment|39016|66598

Well even if it's closer to working at Starbucks than being a high school lit teacher, there are certainly ways to use it to further your career. In some ways it might be better than an overglorified "analyst" who's paid $70,000 pa to make excel spreadsheets and PP presentations. Also one of the great things about Asia is they don't have the politically correct nonsense that acts like totalitarianism in the west, in fact there's reverse sexism and a "ambitious and talented" woman can generally get her way over men, it's completely backwards and I hope the PC movement does not come to Asia, it should stay in the west where it has already done enough damage to the family.

Jul 15, 2013 15:46 Report Abuse

23

babyfacetony
comment|39026|75291

Thanks man and I wish you best of luck too.

Jul 16, 2013 12:15 Report Abuse

24

babyfacetony
comment|39028|75291

Actually,when it comes to dating,most local women tends to think foreigners make more money and cos of this,like to date us.But not all of them think like this.And they don't usually think a corporate man with a tie and suit is better than a teacher who wears trousers/pants/jeans and a T-shirt.It all depends on what part of China we live.I've lived in the north-east of China where the society have criterion to determine who is a teacher or a good teacher.Or to sum it up,who is a good or bad person.There and then a colored person is nothing.That's what Chinese culture is.But I worked as hard as possible through my job and personal life to erase that notion.And then,in that part of China,it was difficult to find a job if you're big or very tall.Even you're white.It was a different thing when I moved to Shanghai in 2006.I was more recieved by the people and it's more open.This is not to say element of discrimination is not in Shanghai.My point is,it's hard to say what brings success in this environment.Except oneself.I've met girls whom when they know you're a teacher,would like to date you and vice-versa.I can agree that the way Esl is run in China makes the job not to be viable as such to some extent.That's what the society is and to really make a job viable or esteemly depends on oneself and not what the society think.From what I can say since I got here,the local people gives a lot of respect to teacher and they admire them.Whether foreign or local teacher.Esl or other subject teacher.And it's our conduct on our job that's makes us distinguished and not the profession itself.As a teacher of over 14yrs experience,out of which almost 10yrs in China,I'm planning to retire as a teacher cos it's too demanding and tiring recently and this is brought by the bad administration of govt regards foreign language teaching.It's now a big biz thing for locals to have a language training company and money rather than real education and teaching.People like me,as a professional teacher don't like this and I'm getting tired of it.So,I'm defting into other fields.

Jul 16, 2013 14:23 Report Abuse