Education Ministry to Regulate Online Tutors in China

Education Ministry to Regulate Online Tutors in China
Jul 16, 2019 Translated by eChinacities.com

The government has begun cracking down on online tutors in China. The country’s Ministry of Education is leading a drive to regulate the sector along with several other government departments.

Under new regulations, teachers already employed in elementary and middle schools will no longer be allowed to provide online tutoring services in China. Foreigners wanting to teach online in China will also be required to provide details of their accreditation, work experience, and employment history as well as the state required qualifications if teaching English, geography, history, politics, maths, Chinese, or the sciences.

The ministry claims that online tutoring platforms in China are plagued by problems, such as unqualified teachers, tutoring that focusses only on test taking, and a lack of customer service. Some are also home to “vulgar and harmful information and online games,” it claims.

Going forward, education authorities in each province will be required to keep tabs on online tutoring platforms in their region, along with their content and teachers. Online classes should also be limited to 40 minutes with a break of at least 10 minutes between lessons, according to the guidelines. In addition, children in China’s compulsory education system should not be taking live steamed lessons after 9pm under the new rules.

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Keywords: online teach online in China online tutors in China

5 Comments

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1

Quinn68
comment|76124|28680

I'm still planning on doing it p/t to supplement my f/t teaching job in China. I don't see how this can be enforced, at least not now.

Jul 18, 2019 06:48 Report Abuse

2

25079832
comment|76122|307887

I have been online teaching for over 3 years. Many Chinese companies provide poor materials to teach with and don't really seem to care about their teachers or students. Some companies neglect to pay their teachers what they are owed, which has happened to myself and other teachers that I know. This was a good job whilst I was going through university and I don't think that a degree is required to teach simple things such as phonics and conversational English. I think that online companies will struggle to meet the demands of their teachers if all are required to go through similar steps as acquiring a Zvisa.

Jul 17, 2019 15:53 Report Abuse

3

Sponge_Bob
comment|76123|1632030

Those company only care about one thing: easy money

Jul 17, 2019 21:56 Report Abuse

4

Lord_hanson
comment|76121|279026

I imagine this will be hard to enforce.

Jul 17, 2019 15:44 Report Abuse

5

Sponge_Bob
comment|76119|1632030

This will be a big hit for online tutor companies for China. I heard these online tutor service pay teachers poorly. Average less than $25 (USD)/hourly.

Jul 17, 2019 13:30 Report Abuse